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Ep 11: Crip Bodies and Crip Aging

Today’s episode is about crip bodies and crip aging. Alice speaks with Patty Berne and Leroy Moore, two people who have a lot of wisdom to share about their bodies and aging. How do we listen, honor, and treat our bodies? How do we value and treasure the elders in our communities? Patty, Leroy, and Alice reflect on this and more.

FYI on the word ‘crip’: There are many people, both disabled and non-disabled, who are uncomfortable with it. It is used deliberately in this episode because there is something culturally specific about celebrating disabled bodies that’s rooted in pride and in direct opposition to the forces that tell us that our bodies are not enough. To crip something is to imbue it with disability culture–the way we age is different. The way our bodies change and move through the world is different. For more, check out this description of crip theory from Wright State University.

Transcript

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Related Links

Sins Invalid, “a performance project that incubates and celebrates artists with disabilities, centralizing artists of color and queer and gender-variant artists as communities who have been historically marginalized.”

Twitter: @SinsInvalid

Krip-Hop Nation. Its mission is “to educate the music, media industries and general public about the talents, history, rights and marketability of Hip-Hop artists and other musicians with disabilities.”

Twitter: @kriphopnation

About

Image description: Leroy F. Moore, Jr., a Black disabled man giving a lecture. He is standing in front of a microphone and wearing a short-sleeve blue shirt. Behind him on a screen is a slide showing a black and white photo of a young Black child. Left of that photo is text that reads, "Blind Joe, The Joe Capers Legacy."
Image description: Leroy F. Moore, Jr., a Black disabled man giving a lecture. He is standing in front of a microphone and wearing a short-sleeve blue shirt. Behind him on a screen is a slide showing a black and white photo of a young Black child. Left of that photo is text that reads, “Blind Joe, The Joe Capers Legacy.”

Leroy F. Moore Jr., Founder of the Krip-Hop Nation and cofounder of Sins Invalid, is an activist, writer, poet, rapper, feminist, and radio programmer. Moore wrote for I.D.E.A.L. Magazine, and since the 1990s, has written the column “Illin-N-Chillin” for POOR Magazine. His books include the spoken-word CD and his upcoming book is a children’s book, Black Disabled Art History 101 that will be publish by Xochitl Justice Press.

As a youth, Moore discovered that most people had little knowledge of the historical impact of disabled African Americans. This led him to begin research, initially in the music industry, and to promote artists with disabilities for broader inclusion. Moore is a leading activist on issues of wrongful incarceration and police brutality against people with disabilities.

He writes, lectures, and performs about race and disability issues both in the United States and abroad.  Moore is one of the founding member of National Black Disability Coalition. Moore has traveled to S Korea for the Para-Olympics and for the 2014 DaDa Fest Krip-Hop Nation UK Tour, as well as to South Africa, Canada, Mexico, and elsewhere, networking internationally with other disabled activists and artists.

Born in 1967 with cerebral palsy in NYC, Leroy Moore, Jr. was blessed to have a conscious, activist father & mother who instilled a strong sense of identity as a Black and disabled youngster. Thus, Moore’s Krip-Hop Nation is a movement that addresses ableism, or discrimination against disabled artists, esp. Black musicians marginalized because of racism AND ableism.

Krip-Hop Nation has over 300 members worldwide who get their message out by publishing articles and hosting events, lectures and workshops.

 

Image description: A woman wearing a green, white and blue blouse is centered in a photo. She is brown skinned with curly hair and is looking to the side with a large smile.
Image description: A woman wearing a green, white and blue blouse is centered in a photo. She is brown skinned with curly hair and is looking to the side with a large smile.

Patty Berne is a Co-Founder, Executive and Artistic Director of Sins Invalid (www.sinsinvalid), a disability justice based performance project centralizing disabled artists of color and queer and gender non-conforming artists with disabilities.  Berne’s training in clinical psychology focused on trauma and healing for survivors of interpersonal and state violence.  Her professional background includes offering mental health support to survivors of violence and advocating for LGBTQI and disability perspectives within the field of reproductive genetic technologies.  Berne’s experiences as a Japanese-Haitian queer disabled woman provides grounding for her work creating “liberated zones” for marginalized voices.  She is widely recognized for her work to establish the framework and practice of disability justice.

 

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Credits

Cheryl Green, Audio Producer and Text Transcript

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Song: “Hard Out Here for A Gimp”

Album: NO BIG DEAL

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

Credits, thank you for playing” by Komiku. (Source: freemusicarchive.org. Licensed under CC0 1.0 Universal License.)

Coffee Shop” and “Open Windows” by David Szesztay. (Source: freemusicarchive.org. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.)

Building Time Lapse” and “No Solace” by Podington Bear. (Source: freemusicarchive.org. Licensed under Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.)

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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