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Ep 30: Film Criticism

Today’s episode is about film criticism with two disabled film critics, Kristen Lopez and Angelo Muredda. Kristen and Angelo discuss how they became film critics, the challenges of being a disabled film critic, and why film criticism is so slow to change when it comes to inclusion of disabled people in the profession. They also discuss problematic disabled narratives and accessibility at film festivals and movie theaters.

Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

Actiview. (April 18, 2018). Fighting for the Right to Accessibility. Medium.com

Anderson, Tre’vell. (July 16, 2018). ‘There’s room for everyone’: 14 film critics on making media more inclusive. LA Times.

Angelo Muredda’s profile on Letterboxd.

Jordan Harris, Scott. (March 7, 2014). Able-bodied actors and disability drag: Why disabled roles are only for disabled performers. RogerEbert.com

Lopez, Kristen. (March 28, 2018). Disability theater access in 2018. RogerEbert.com

Lopez, Kristen. (June 30, 2018). Disabled critics need to be included in the film critic diversity campaign. Culturess.com

Lopez, Kristen. (July 8, 2016). Don’t look to the movies to learn about disability. Pacific Standard.

Lopez, Kristen. (July 6, 2018). Marvel’s ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ and Hollywood’s Misunderstanding of Disability. The Daily Beast.

Lopez, Kristen, (July 13, 2018). ‘Skyscraper’ is a Surprising Mark of Improvement for Disabled Representation on the Big Screen. SlashFilm.com

Wilkinson, Alissa. (June 23, 2018). The real reason we need more diversity in film criticism. Vox.

Pieces by Angelo Muredda on Cinema-Scope.com

About

Caucasian female with brown hair wearing a black shirt facing camera.
Caucasian female with brown hair wearing a black shirt facing camera.

Kristen Lopez is a freelance film critic and pop culture essayists whose work has appeared in The Hollywood Reporter, The Daily Beast and Roger Ebert.com. She writes on disabled representation, feminism and classic film. In her free time she hosts two podcasts, Citizen Dame and Ticklish Business.

Twitter: @journeys_film

A head and shoulders shot of Angelo, facing the camera and half-smiling. He has short dark hair, a short moustache and goatee, and round metal eyeglasses, and is wearing a navy sweater and striped collared shirt. He is sitting in front of a bookshelf, kitchen, and standing lamp.
A head and shoulders shot of Angelo, facing the camera and half-smiling. He has short dark hair, a short moustache and goatee, and round metal eyeglasses, and is wearing a navy sweater and striped collared shirt. He is sitting in front of a bookshelf, kitchen, and standing lamp.

Angelo Muredda is a Toronto-based film critic and educator whose work has appeared in Cinema Scope, The Walrus, Now Magazine, TVO, and Film Freak Central. He is also a PhD candidate in English at the University of Toronto, where he works on representations of disabled children in Canadian fiction and film, and has taught Canadian literature and writing. In his spare time he curates No Future, a film series at the Royal Cinema devoted to uncanny children in genre cinema, and co-hosts Highly Logical: A Star Trek Podcast.  

Twitter: @amuredda

 

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Credits

Geraldine Ah-Sue, Audio Producer

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Cheryl Green, Text Transcript

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Song: “Dance Off”

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

Violet” by Podington Bear (Violet by Podington Bear is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.)

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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