A woman with long red hair wearing a white cap. She's in a wheelchair and has a bunch of yellow flowers in front of her.

People We Love: Alana Theriault, Berkeley, CA

This is a GREAT quote from Alana Theriault about changes in the independent living philosophy:

The latest incarnation of Independent Living includes increased case management. Don’t ask me how many bureaucrats and health care “professionals” are involved in my bathing and dressing…who, how often, for how long…

Many people think my disability is the problem. The paternal “safety net” is my biggest problem; the rest is just the human condition.


Alana Theriault is a disability benefits advocate, trainer, and artist living in Berkeley with her sweetheart and two demanding cats.

Check out her artwork: http://www.alanadesigns.com

Do you have a badass quote you’d like to share?

Email Alice: alicat155@gmail.com

Media Partner #29: Sarah Levis, Haliburton, Ontario

Please welcome Sarah Levis, our 29th media partner!

Photo of a white woman with shoulder length brown hair. She is looking sideways and wearing an orange t-shirt.

A writer, advocate, activist and educator, Sarah draws on 20 years of combined volunteer and work experience with people with disabilities to pursue two passions: writing and working toward a society where all people feel safe, welcome, and empowered to participate fully and meaningfully in their schools, workplaces and communities.

Sarah’s involvement with the disability community as front-line worker, friend, and person living with both visible and invisible disabilities gives her a unique perspective from which to comment on disability-related issues and to teach others about the realities of living in society as a person with a disability. She uses her award-winning blog, “Girl With The Cane,” to talk about disability-related issues, and has written for several online and print publications, including “Disability Horizons,” “Ollibean,” “Abilities” magazine and the Accessible Clean Taxis Coalition website

Girl with the Cane blog: http://www.girlwiththecane.com

Sarah’s About Me page: http://about.me/sarahlevis

Twitter:@GirlWithTheCane

An African-American woman wearing eyeglasses and dressed in a long-sleeved red shirt. She is sitting in a wheelchair.

Guest blog post: Anita Cameron, ADAPT History Project

Anita Cameron is an activist and a member of ADAPT. She describes herself this way: “I’m a disability rights activist, CERT instructor/Program Manager, writer and cat lover who has been fighting the good fight for almost 30 years.”

ADAPT is a national grass-roots community that organizes disability rights activists to engage in nonviolent direct action, including civil disobedience, to assure the civil and human rights of people with disabilities to live in freedom.

The follow excerpt is a story by Anita about her direct action in Chicago in 1992:

Ah, Chicago! I remember that action well. Chicago is my hometown, and it was the first time in four years that I had been back since moving to Colorado. 

On Sunday, a Mother’s Day action was planned, but ADAPT learned that Louis Sullivan, Secretary of Health and Human Services, was in town. We certainly weren’t going to snub the gift that the ADAPT gods had placed before us! Sullivan was in Chicago to give the commencement address to two graduating classes at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle – which happens to be my alma mater! I was excited to be one of the 30 or so ADAPTers who made it into the UIC Pavilion. We went in undercover, which for us, meant not showing our ADAPT T-shirts. The rest of us were outside leafleting the folks who were going in for the ceremonies. 

Once inside, we unfurled our huge banner that read “State Schools/Nursing Homes: Hell No We Won’t Go”. That banner hung across the stage for a while – maybe twenty-minutes or more that I can remember. Of course, the majority of us got kicked out immediately, but a few – Bob Kafka, myself, and a couple of others managed to stay inside. When Sullivan began speaking, we began chanting and disrupting his speech. I remember Bob Kafka and me scooting on our butts down the steps to try to get onto the stage, but we were picked up and booted out.

For the entire blog post: http://www.adapt.org/freeourpeople/adapt25/narratives/19adapt.htm

Check out other stories by ADAPT members celebrating their history of activism: http://www.adapt.org/freeourpeople/adapt25/

For more on ADAPT: http://www.adapt.org


More on Anita Cameron: http://wefollow.com/adaptanita

Blog: http://www.angryblackwomyn.com/blog

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/anitacameron

Twitter: https://twitter.com/adaptanita

Anita’s profile at The Mobility Resourcehttp://www.themobilityresource.com/author/anita/

Anita’s articles at Yahoo! Voices: http://contributor.yahoo.com/user/691438/anita_cameron.html

 

Do you have a story you’d like to share? Would you like to write a guest blog post for us? Email Alice: alicat155@gmail.com

An African-American woman with long hair holding a framed poster that says 'Keep Calm and Lead On.' She is smiling at the camera.

Media Partner #28: Kamilah Martin-Proctor

Our project’s 28th media partner is Kamilah Martin-Proctor, founder and Executive Director of the Martin Multiple Sclerosis Alliance Foundation (MMSAF).

She was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis when she was sixteen.  She founded the MMSAF in 2004 in an effort to promote symptom awareness and education about Multiple Sclerosis in historically under represented and underserved populations. She was the Program Administrator for the Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program at Howard University. She was the Ward 4 co-coordinator for the District of Columbia’s Government Neighborhood Services Initiative; Legislative Correspondent for Congresswoman Shelia Jackson Lee D-TX and Executive Assistant in Senator Robert Menendez’s D-NJ office.

Mrs. Martin-Proctor received a B.A. in Political Science and an M.A. in Organizational and Cultural Communication from Howard University.

Photo of six African American men and women standing in a row wearing t-shirts from a fundraising walk for the Martin Multiple Sclerosis Alliance Foundation

Website: http://www.manyfacesofms.org

Twitter: @KamilahProctor

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2204172104/

SM_LogoTagline_Color

Media Partner #27: Cheryl Green and StoryMinders

Our 27th media partner also believes in the power of storytelling: Cheryl Green and StoryMinders.

Cheryl Green is a writer, director, filmmaker and founder of StoryMinders. StoryMinders provides education and advocacy through film by and about people with brain injury.

“Film can bring personal stories to life while challenging the stigma, isolation, and social inequities people with disabilities routinely experience.”  –Cheryl Green

Head shot of Cheryl Green: a middle aged white woman with long brown curly hair wearing a purple t-shirt

One StoryMinders project is the film “Who Am I To Stop It,” a non-inspirational feature-length documentary film about three artists with brain injury in the Pacific Northwest.

Logo for Who Am I To Stop film with the profile of a person's face with a fishbowl where the brain is located with a goldfish inside the fishbowl

Cheryl Green

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cherylgreenstoryminders

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/CherylVerde


StoryMinders: http://storyminders.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StoryMinders

Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/storyminders


Who Am I To Stop It: http://whoamitostopit.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WhoAmIToStopIt

On the left half of the image is a photo of the Golden Gate Bride with the following text superimposed over the image: CITY BY THE BAY CITY THAT KNOWS HOW EVERYBODY’S FAVORITE CITY FOG CITY FRISCO GOLDEN CITY GOLD GATE CITY SAN FRAN SHAKY TOWN. On the right half of the image, text behind a black background. The text reads: BEHIND EVERY NAME IS A STORY…WHAT'S YOURS? Disability Visibility Project & StoryCorps invites you to record your story about the disability experience in America. http://disabilityvisibilityproject.com @DisVisibility #DisabilityVisibility Stories will be included in the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress

New images for DVP: San Francisco, Atlanta and Chicago!

Wow. The Disability Visibility Project is continually astounded by the generosity and enthusiasm by the disability community. As our first media partner, Patrick Cokley of Lead On Update created some images for our project during the initial launch in June. Patrick did it again, this time with city-specific images for the DVP!

Please share and use them!! Below are the images with a written description of each.

On the left half of the image is a photo of the Atlanta skyline with the following text superimposed over the image: ATL-THE A- A TOWN-BLACK MECCA- CITY IN A FOREST CITY OF TREES- THE BIG PEACH DOGWOOD CITY- HOTLANTA-CITY OF THE SOUTH-THE CITY TOO BUSY TO HATE-CONVENTION CITY OF DIXIE. On the right half of the image, text behind a black background. The text reads: BEHIND EVERY NAME IS A STORY…WHAT'S YOURS? Disability Visibility Project & StoryCorps invites you to record your story about the disability experience in America. http://disabilityvisibilityproject.com @DisVisibility #DisabilityVisibility Stories will be included in the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress Poster created by the Lead On Network for the Disability Visibility Project—Keep Calm and Lead On!  2014

On the left half of the image is a photo of the Atlanta skyline with the following text superimposed over the image: ATL-THE A- A TOWN-BLACK MECCA- CITY IN A FOREST CITY OF TREES- THE BIG PEACH DOGWOOD CITY- HOTLANTA-CITY OF THE SOUTH-THE CITY TOO BUSY TO HATE-CONVENTION CITY OF DIXIE. On the right half of the image, text behind a black background. The text reads: BEHIND EVERY NAME IS A STORY…WHAT’S YOURS? Disability Visibility Project & StoryCorps invites you to record your story about the disability experience in America. http://disabilityvisibilityproject.com @DisVisibility #DisabilityVisibility Stories will be included in the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress. Poster created by the Lead On Network for the Disability Visibility Project—Keep Calm and Lead On! 2014

On the left half of the image is a photo of the Chicago skyline with the following text superimposed over the image: SECOND CITY WINDY CITY CHI-TOWN CITY OF THE BIG SHOULDERS CITY BY TE LAKE CITY IN A GARDEN CITY ON THE MAKE GREAT COMMERCIAL TREE HEART OF AMERICA MY KIND OF TOWN PARIS ON THE PRARIE SWEET HOME THAT TODDLING TOWN THE BIG ONION THE CITY BEAUTIFUL THE CITY THAT WORKS THE JEWEL OF THE MIDWEST THE THIRD COAST CHI-CITY. On the right half of the image, text behind a black background. The text reads: BEHIND EVERY NAME IS A STORY…WHAT'S YOURS? Disability Visibility Project & StoryCorps invites you to record your story about the disability experience in America. http://disabilityvisibilityproject.com @DisVisibility #DisabilityVisibility Stories will be included in the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress

On the left half of the image is a photo of the Chicago skyline with the following text superimposed over the image: SECOND CITY WINDY CITY CHI-TOWN CITY OF THE BIG SHOULDERS CITY BY TE LAKE CITY IN A GARDEN CITY ON THE MAKE GREAT COMMERCIAL TREE HEART OF AMERICA MY KIND OF TOWN PARIS ON THE PRARIE SWEET HOME THAT TODDLING TOWN THE BIG ONION THE CITY BEAUTIFUL THE CITY THAT WORKS THE JEWEL OF THE MIDWEST THE THIRD COAST CHI-CITY. On the right half of the image, text behind a black background. The text reads: BEHIND EVERY NAME IS A STORY…WHAT’S YOURS? Disability Visibility Project & StoryCorps invites you to record your story about the disability experience in America. http://disabilityvisibilityproject.com @DisVisibility #DisabilityVisibility Stories will be included in the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress. Poster created by the Lead On Network for the Disability Visibility Project—Keep Calm and Lead On! 2014

On the left half of the image is a photo of the Golden Gate Bride with the following text superimposed over the image: CITY BY THE BAY CITY THAT KNOWS HOW EVERYBODY’S FAVORITE CITY FOG CITY FRISCO GOLDEN CITY GOLD GATE CITY SAN FRAN SHAKY TOWN. On the right half of the image, text behind a black background. The text reads: BEHIND EVERY NAME IS A STORY…WHAT'S YOURS? Disability Visibility Project & StoryCorps invites you to record your story about the disability experience in America. http://disabilityvisibilityproject.com @DisVisibility #DisabilityVisibility Stories will be included in the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress

On the left half of the image is a photo of the Golden Gate Bride with the following text superimposed over the image: CITY BY THE BAY CITY THAT KNOWS HOW EVERYBODY’S FAVORITE CITY FOG CITY FRISCO GOLDEN CITY GOLD GATE CITY SAN FRAN SHAKY TOWN. On the right half of the image, text behind a black background. The text reads: BEHIND EVERY NAME IS A STORY…WHAT’S YOURS? Disability Visibility Project & StoryCorps invites you to record your story about the disability experience in America. http://disabilityvisibilityproject.com @DisVisibility #DisabilityVisibility Stories will be included in the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress. Poster created by the Lead On Network for the Disability Visibility Project—Keep Calm and Lead On! 2014


 THANK YOU PATRICK & THE LEAD ON NETWORK!!!

In addition to his work at Lead On Update, Patrick Cokley is Policy Advisor, Office of Disability Employment Policy at U.S. Department of Labor.

For more on Patrick: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/patrick-cokley/7/296/3a8

The Lead On Update is the latest resource to find all of the week’s articles on technology, employment, and education as well as happenings on Capitol Hill as they relate to disability. The Update is published weekly and includes articles and resources from news outlets, the blogosphere and disability related listservs and organizations. Rather than subscribe to multiple lists or have to search the Internet for relevant content, check the Lead On Update weekly to learn what is happening in the disability community.

Website: http://www.leadonnetwork.org/wordpress/

Twitter: @LeadOnUpdate

Screen shot of the Criptiques website. The text says: Criptiques. Exploring the provocative side of disability

Media Partner #26: Caitlin Wood and Criptiques

Our 26th media partner is Caitlin Wood and Criptiques!

Edited by Caitlin Wood, Criptiques is a groundbreaking collection of essays by disabled authors examining the often overlooked, provocative sides of disability. Exploring themes of gender, sexuality, disability/crip culture, identity, ableism and much more, this important anthology provides much needed space for thought-provoking discourse from a highly diverse group of writers. Criptiques takes a cue from the disability rights slogan “Nothing About Us Without Us,” illuminating disability experiences from those with firsthand knowledge. Criptiques is for people invested in crip culture, the ones just discovering it, and those completely unfamiliar with the term.

Check out the anthology, their podcasts, and their free e-book.

two stickers with black text against a white background that reads 'Criptiques.' Seven buttons in red, black and white varieties. They read either 'Criptiques' or 'Crip' in bold red text against a white background

Website: http://criptiques.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Criptiques

Twitter: @Criptiques

Two young women smiling at the camera. One has brown hair in a ponytail and glasses, she is sitting in a wheelchair. Another young woman is standing behind her with shoulder-length brown hair.

Disabled Girls Talk podcast: Generation ADA

On the 24th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Emily Ladau and Maddy Ruvolo launched Disabled Girls Talk podcast & tumblr.

Here are some excerpts from their inaugural podcast, “Generation ADA”:

Maddy: Yes. So Emily, I’m going to start off by asking you a really big question. How has the passage of the ADA impacted your life?

Emily: So my first instinct was to answer this question with one specific way the ADA’s impacted my life, but then I realized the ADA essentially infiltrates and impacts my entire life. I compare my life to my mother and my uncle, who both have the same disability that I do, and were born many years before the passage of the ADA. And there were no laws at that time ensuring equal access and equal opportunities and removing barriers and fighting against discrimination, so a lot of opportunities that are open to me were unfortunately closed to them. So that’s something that I celebrate and appreciate whenever I can, but in a way I also feel like I take the ADA for granted because even though the ADA is the reason that there are ramps, per say, in public places, that allow me to go somewhere that I might want to be with my non-disabled peers. When I’m going up that ramp I’m not thinking, “thanks ADA for making that building accessible for me.” I’m thinking, “oh right, there’s a ramp. I can get into this building like everybody else. So in a way that the fact that I’m able to take access for granted when it is available to me – unfortunately not all the time – but when it’s there and I can just appreciate it as being another part of my surroundings, I think that’s how the ADA has the biggest impact on my life. And what would you say is your big impact that the ADA has had on your life?

Maddy: Yeah, so I’m gonna go more specific here, because there’s one thing when we were talking about this that immediately sprang to mind for me and that was college. So I got sick with my chronic illness when I was in high school. And while I was in high school I had accommodations that were covered under IDEA, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. When I got to college, I was under the ADA, and the fact that I was able to go to college was completely dependent on having these accommodations, having housing – having medical housing, having academic accommodations that work with the particulars of my chronic illness. And so when I think about the ADA, I think about how I wouldn’t have been able to go to college without it. I definitely agree with you about sort of taking it for granted and about really just taking our rights for granted, which I think is good, because they’re not special privileges or things we are being gifted. They’re what we’re entitled to as human beings. We’re entitled to equal rights. And so I definitely agree with you that our sort of defining element or defining aspect of being part of the ADA generation is that we take these things for granted. And of course on days like the ADA anniversary, we celebrate those things, but yeah, in my everyday life, I don’t really think about the fact that had I been born 20 years earlier, it would have been a completely different story.

Listen to their podcast and read the entire transcript: http://disabledgirlstalk.tumblr.com/post/92900675997/disabled-girls-talk-episode-1-generation-ada-the

Do you have a podcast, tumblr or blog you would like to share with us? Email Alice: alicat155@gmail.com

 These disabled girls truly rock!!


Disabled Girls Talk

Tumblr: http://disabledgirlstalk.tumblr.com

Twitter: @DisabledGirlPod


Emily’s Twitter: @emily_ladau

Emily’s Blog: Words I Wheel By

Maddy’s Twitter: @maddyruvolo

Multicolored background with the words: Hammer Residences, Inc., “Respecting Abilities. Reaching for Opportunities. Realizing Dreams.”

Media Partner #25: Hammer Residences Inc.

Welcome Hammer Residences Inc., the project’s 25th media partner!

Located in Wayzata, Minnesota, Hammer Residences Inc. is a nonprofit organization with a 90-year history of providing innovative services for people with disabilities to live meaningful, self-directed lives. Hammer’s mission is to provide adults and children with developmental disabilities the opportunity to experience life to its fullest.

They provide a number of services such as residential, in-home support, case management, support planning among others. Their motto is the following: “Respecting Abilities. Reaching for Opportunities. Realizing Dreams.”

Check out three videos featuring their members:

Joy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGxXbu-eP7Y

Leslie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wg1U4E8UFVk

James: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mw0BvJwSpDk

Screen shot from Hammer's YouTube site: https://www.youtube.com/user/HammerResidences?blend=2&ob=0

 

Website: http://www.hammer.org

Blog: http://blog.hammer.org

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HammerMN

Twitter: @Hammer_MN

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/HammerResidences?blend=2&ob=0

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/847366?trk=tyah

 

 

Image with a magenta background white text. Line 1: Disabled Girls Talk Line 2: Podcast featuring Line 3: Maddy Ruvolo and Emily Ladau Line 4: An ongoing discussion about coming of age with a disability.

Disabled Girls Talk: #BecauseOfTheADA tweets

On the 24th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Emily Ladau and Maddy Ruvolo launched Disabled Girls Talk podcast & tumblr. Kicking things off, they started a twitter conversation using the hashgtag #BecauseOfTheADA and it burned like a wildfire throughout the twittersphere!

Who says twitter activism is ineffectual? Here are a few of our favorite tweets:

For a full recap, check out the Storify of #BecauseOfTheADA: https://storify.com/DisabledGirlPod/becauseoftheada

The Disability Visibility Project is a huge fan of these two

dynamic disabled women activists!


Disabled Girls Talk

Tumblr: http://disabledgirlstalk.tumblr.com

Twitter: @DisabledGirlPod


Emily’s Twitter: @emily_ladau

Emily’s Blog: Words I Wheel By

Maddy’s Twitter: @maddyruvolo